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Can you receive student financial aid with a drug conviction on your record?

| Mar 6, 2021 | Drug Crimes |

There are many terms and conditions, or “fine print,” included in financial aid applications and on promissory notes that you may have to sign to secure higher education funding. Some of that paperwork likely describes what happens if a judge or jury convicts you of a criminal offense.

In short: You may find yourself in jeopardy of losing your ability to fund your college or university education if you end up with a drug conviction. 

What type of student financial aid might a conviction affect?

A conviction of your record can impact your ability to receive various types of funding, from federal student aid to grants and private loans. It can also affect your receipt of scholarships or participation in work-study programs. Some colleges and universities may even have policies on the books prohibiting students with certain convictions from attending their school. 

How does the U.S. Department of Education learn about your conviction?

You must fill out a new Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) so that the U.S. Department of Education can confirm your aid eligibility. One piece of information that this form asks about is whether you have any drug-related convictions. The federal agency may suspend your eligibility for financial aid when you answer the question in the affirmative. You may face perjury charges if you lie when responding to this question.

Is it possible to regain eligibility for student financial aid after a drug conviction?

A suspension of financial aid due to a drug conviction generally isn’t permanent. You may regain eligibility for financial support once you complete a drug rehabilitation program and have at least two successful random narcotics screens. 

What can you do to do to minimize your chances of losing financial aid?

It’s never an ideal time to be facing drug charges. It’s even worse when you’re in the middle of your university studies here in Colorado, though. A drug crimes attorney can help you explore different defense strategies that you may employ in your Colorado Springs case. The approach you two decide to go with may help you keep your financial aid and stay on course in completing your studies. 

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