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Study drugs may lead to criminal charges

On Behalf of | Feb 10, 2022 | Drug Crimes |

Individuals who are in college often have very taxing schedules. The demands of going to class, having to work and other life events might become overwhelming. For some, turning to study drugs to help them stay awake for marathon study sessions or to take care of other things might be tempting.

It’s best to avoid taking study drugs because they can cause health problems. They can also lead to criminal charges because you’re taking a prescription that doesn’t belong to you. These points can turn your decision into the start of a nightmare.

What criminal charges can you face for prescription drugs?

If the prescription isn’t written to you, it’s possible that you’ll face drug charges. This can include possession, but may also include other charges. Being in possession of a controlled substance in Colorado is a felony charge. The only exception to this is if the substance is a schedule III, IV, or V besides ketamine or flunitrazepam.

The possible incarceration period you’re facing depends on the type of charges lodged. Class 1 misdemeanors have a jail time of up to 18 months. Felonies range from 1 to 1.5 years for a Class 6, 1 to 3 years for a class 5, or 2 to 6 years for a class 4.

College students who are facing criminal charges for having drugs that weren’t prescribed to them should find out about their defense options. You could face considerable consequences with these types of charges. Your ability to continue attending the school of your choice might even be affected. Working on your defense strategy quickly may help you to find ways that you can minimize those potential consequences. 

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